Good data is essential for a successful study. Whilst analysis is important, standardisation in the clinic is imperative.

Posted:
30
August 2011

Good data is essential for a successful study. Whilst analysis is important, standardisation in the clinic is imperative.Although many may claim they are specialists in conducting TQT studies, few have the data to back this up. Our published data shows that over the past decade, Richmond Pharmacology�s studies have consistently produced less variability of QT measurements when compared directly with our competitors. This confirms that we are the leading research unit for cardiac safety studies - either as a one stop solution or in conjunction with our preferred partner core labs.At Richmond Pharmacology our mantra is good data in equals good data out.Our 10th Birthday PromiseWe are so confident and proud of our 100% success rate in TQT studies that should we fail to show assay sensitivity we will repeat the study at no cost to our sponsors.To take us up on our promise, contact our Business Development team today to discuss your TQT study needs

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