Statement from Dr. Jorg Taubel

Posted:
16
March 2006

I want to reassure volunteers about taking part in a Phase 1 clinical trial following recent media reports of a tragedy at another hospital-based research facility. On behalf of everyone here at Richmond I would like to wish the volunteers in question a quick and full recovery; our thoughts are with them and their families.We are concerned by the events of the past few days.Clinical trials are an essential aspect of medicines development and the chances of someone suffering a fatal injury following a clinical trial are incredibly rare � we estimate that it is somewhere between one in five hundred thousand and one in one million - the same as the risk of suffering a fatal injury during a fairground ride or swimming.Every aspect of a new medicine is closely monitored during the 12 years it takes to be developed.It must undergo rigorous testing before it can be first tested in humans, after this stage the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA), will conduct a thorough safety assessment and may or may not approve the use of the medicine in clinical trials. As a further precaution, the medicine can only be released for a clinical trial if it is approved by a Qualified Person (QP) in the pharmaceutical company responsible for producing the new medicine.As a further screen, an independent ethics committee examines every aspect of the trial that affects volunteers to ensure that they are fully informed of all procedures, risks and benefits.We are fully committed to conduct research which follows all the regulatory guidelines because they ensure that clinical trials are conducted safely.

Latest news

Upcoming Event

EUFEMED, 3rd Annual Conference, 28-30 April 2021

28-30 April 2021
Dr Jorg Taubel will co-chair a session on day one, which explores how technology has reduced the risks of pandemic effects on Phase I and II trial performance.
View event

Novel rate-controlled fentanyl patch shows promise in phase I clinical trial

April 1, 2021
Our expertise in ethnic differences and access to over 12,000 first generation Japanese volunteers accelerated our ability to provide robust clinical trial data to support future applications of new chronic pain medicines to the Japanese drug market.
Read more

A new era for UK-Japanese scientific relations

March 23, 2021
Dr Taubel uses his experience of conducting more than 60 Japanese bridging studies to explain why the deal is of strategic importance to the UK and highlights the scientific requirements for conducting successful Japanese trials abroad
Read more

Richmond Pharmacology’s local MP Neil Coyle calls on the Government to evaluate the potential of using Clinical Research Organisations.

February 3, 2021
Richmond Pharmacology has offered its services to the Government and the NHS as an additional vaccine site in London
Read more